Thursday, 20 July 2017

NEWSLINK: Saving 2 tigers gives more value than the cost of Mangalyaan!

Comparing tigers and Mangalyaan may seem bizarre but a new bio-economic analysis throws up interesting statistics -- saving two big cats gives more value than the cost of India’s much-hyped maiden mission to Mars.


In a one-of-its-kind analysis, an Indo-Australian team of scientists has published a paper titled ‘Making the hidden visible: Economic valuation of tiger reserves in India’ in the journal Ecosystem Services.

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ARTICLE: The lady and the panther: Life-changing communication with animals

What would it be like to be able to communicate with other animals on this planet? With two-thirds of all nonhuman animal life already destroyed by us, we are in need of redemption to save them and ourselves.

In order to speak to us, animals usually have to overcome a lot of trauma. Imagine being a Wisconsin woodland creature, having watched your young fawns or best friend shot in front of you. Imagine watching your mother bear run by packs of dogs and shot out of a tree, never to return to help you survive your first winter. Imagine walking along the creek in winter to find a young beaver in a trap, struggling to breathe and stay above the waterline, or a fox dying in a steel jaw trap.

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Wednesday, 19 July 2017

NEWSLINK: More reported cougar sightings off back of recent article

Last week’s column about a confirmed cougar sighting in southern Michigan brought us mail from readers who believe they saw one in this area about year ago.

Scott Helms of South Bend wrote:

“Last year my wife and I spotted one at Potato Creek State Park. We were driving not too far from the main gate, heading toward the nature center to go walking when we smelled a dead carcass in the air. Immediately after, we spotted a large cat-like animal run across the road in front of our vehicle. Unfortunately, it didn’t want to stand around for a photo op, otherwise we would have taken a picture. When we reported it to a DNR officer at the Nature Center, he told us they have had other reports just like ours, but until someone gets a photo, they can’t confirm it. During the past year, someone reported on Facebook a sighting west of South Bend. That person didn’t get a photo either.”

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NEWSLINK: Leopard shocker for residents of Kolar

People of Arabhikottanur and forest department officials heaved a sigh of “little” relief after an eight-year-old male leopard was found trapped on Saturday night in a cage placed by the forest department at Arabhikottanur village in Kolar district. A large number of villagers thronged to see the trapped leopard in the village. The forest department staff, who arrived at the spot, shifted the feline to the Nagarahole forest.

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NEWSLINK: Lynx release plans for Kielder and Scottish Borders take giant stride forward

Plans to introduce big cats back to the Borders have taken a giant stride forward.


Just over a year ago the Lynx UK Trust announced their plans to explore the possibility of bringing the Eurasian lynx back into the British ecosystem.


An international team of experts has spent the last year detailing an approach to a reintroduction, consulting with national stakeholders, studying potential release sites, and consulting with local communities and businesses.

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PHOTO: Shadow of a Cub Brings More Hope for Tigers in Russia

A photograph just released by PROO Tiger Center provides further evidence that tigers are re-colonizing lost habitat in Russia.


The image shows Svetlaya, an adult Amur tigress that was orphaned in the wild, raised in captivity, and released back into the wild in 2014, walking along a trail in April 2017 with her back half caked in spring mud. But what really has scientists celebrating is that the photograph reveals the legs and shadow of at least one cub!

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Tuesday, 18 July 2017

ARTICLE: Beyond the barbed wire: animal-human conflict

The animal-human conflict is on the rise as evident from frequent print and visual reports of tiger and leopard straying into human habitation and attacking people and livestock. Usually these predators’ end is fatal, with a lucky few being rescued by authorities to be relocated. In the mass hysteria generated by such cases, the critical why and how of the incident is crucially missed. This is what Krishnendu Bose’s 45-minute documentary The Tiger Who Crossed The Line, winner of the National Award for Best Environment Film including Best Agricultural Film 2016, brings into sharp focus.

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